Tag Archives: welfare

Lost and Found – January 8th Edition

What to remember about January 8th…

  • 1642  Italian astronomer and scientist Galileo Galilei dies (b. 1564); considered by many the “Father of Modern Science”
  • 1790  In New York City, President Washington delivers the nations 1st State of the Union speech to Congress
  • 1815  2-weeks after end of the War of 1812, Andrew Jackson’s militia defeat British forces at Battle of New Orleans
  • 1867  Republican Congress overrides President Andrew Johnson’s veto; 1st law in nation granting African-American men the right to vote is passed
  • 1964  President Lyndon Johnson announces his “war on poverty” at State of the Union address; birth of the American welfare state
  • 1973  Watergate trial begins for 7 men accused of breaking into and bugging Democrat Party headquarters
  • 2002  President George W. Bush signs “No Child Left Behind Act”
  •  2011  Jared Lee Loughner goes on shooting rampage in Arizona; 6 killed and 13 wounded including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords

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Lost and Found – January 8th Edition

What to remember about January 8th…

  • 1642  Italian astronomer and scientist Galileo Galilei dies (b. 1564); considered by many the “Father of Modern Science”
  • 1790  In New York City, President Washington delivers the nations 1st State of the Union speech to Congress
  • 1815  2-weeks after end of the War of 1812, Andrew Jackson’s militia defeat British forces at Battle of New Orleans
  • 1867  Republican Congress overrides President Andrew Johnson’s veto; 1st law in nation granting African-American men the right to vote is passed
  • 1964  President Lyndon Johnson announces his “war on poverty” at State of the Union address; birth of the American welfare state
  • 1973  Watergate trial begins for 7 men accused of breaking into and bugging Democrat Party headquarters
  • 2002  President George W. Bush signs “No Child Left Behind Act”
  •  2011  Jared Lee Loughner goes on shooting rampage in Arizona; 6 killed and 13 wounded including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords

Lost and Found – January 8th Edition

What to remember about January 8th…

  • 1642  Italian astronomer and scientist Galileo Galilei dies (b. 1564); considered by many the “Father of Modern Science”
  • 1790  In New York City, President Washington delivers the nations 1st State of the Union speech to Congress
  • 1815  2-weeks after end of the War of 1812, Andrew Jackson’s militia defeat British forces at Battle of New Orleans
  • 1867  Republican Congress overrides President Andrew Johnson’s veto; 1st law in nation granting African-American men the right to vote is passed
  • 1964  President Lyndon Johnson announces his “war on poverty” at State of the Union address; birth of the American welfare state
  • 1973  Watergate trial begins for 7 men accused of breaking into and bugging Democrat Party headquarters
  • 2002  President George W. Bush signs “No Child Left Behind Act”
  •  2011  Jared Lee Loughner goes on shooting rampage in Arizona; 6 killed and 13 wounded including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords

Ode to the Welfare State… or Occupy Wall Street

This is from an article titled “Ode to the Welfare State” in the New York “Daily News” dated Friday, November 4, 1949.  It seems even more relevant to today’s democrats and especially members of Obama’s Occupy movement.

“…at the tail end of a recent session of Congress, Representative Clarence J. Brown (R – Ohio) jammed into the Congressional Record the following poem, describing its author only as “a prominent Democrat of the State of Georgia”:

DEMOCRATIC DIALOG
 
Father, must I go to work?
No, my lucky son.
We’re living now on Easy Street
On dough from Washington
 
We’ve left it up to Uncle Sam
so don’t get exercised.
Nobody has to give a damn
We’ve all been subsidized.
 
But if Sam treats us all so well
And feeds us milk and honey,
Please, daddy, tell me what the hell
He’s going to use for money.
 
Don’t worry, bub, there’s not a hitch
In this here noble plan
He simply soaks the filthy rich
And helps the common man.
 
But, father, won’t there come a time
When they run out of cash
And we have left them not a dime
When things will go to smash?
 
My faith in you is shrinking, son,
You nosy little brat;
You do too damn much thinking, son,
To be a Democrat.
 

Aristotle knew about Welfare Riots

The aftermath of the riots in England last week is still evident on many streets and in the faces of residents whose peaceful lives were shattered during the violence.  Massive cleanup efforts and long-term economic effects are still being evaluated while politicians posture before taking their first definitive actions.  Well, the history forgotten is what the government bureaucrats are dealing with now.

A contemporary of Aristotle once said that ” a person’s life persuades better than his word.”  I couldn’t agree more after watching the hooliganism unleashed on the communities of Hackney, Camden, Peckham, Stratford, and others.  Despite media assertions that the riots were caused by a questionable police shooting, I find that to be merely an excuse.

Anybody can become angry – that is easy, but to be angry with the right person and to the right degree and at the right time and for the right purpose, and in the right way – that is not within everybody’s power and is not easy. – Aristotle

How we react to the challenges and difficulties of life mark what kind of society we have become.  When tens of thousands of TEA Party activists can gather in cities all over America without incident the media calls it “incitement”.  When paid union thugs beat a black activist in public they are vindicated.  When government attempts to pull back from fiscal catastrophe it is called “terrorism” or “moronic”.  When eco-terrorists can stalk women and children or destroy millions in property it is hailed as freedom of expression.  What indication do these incidents give as to where western society stands today?

“Tipping point”  is a phrase popularized not too long ago that feels very appropriate to the emerging civil unrest.  The welfare class created by politicians and bureaucrats to ensure their own power is a smoldering engine with barely leashed destructive potential.  By allowing – even encouraging – citizens to stay out of the productive process of society and rewarding their indolence, the governments of these “liberal democracies” have attempted to leash the dependent to their will.  They hope to ensure that those on the dole will continue to listen to and vote for those that grant them their sustenance at someone elses expense.

He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god. – Aristotle

In fact, what the politicians have wrought is not a welfare class but an entitlement class.  This group sees the world through a prism shaped by self-indulgence, greed, and rights without responsibility.  They desire to attain all the benefits of a wealthy society without contributing to the formation of that wealth.  They seek to consume and reproduce without any regard to the prospects of others and the government rewards them for making these bad choices.  This is called a moral hazard (def: the tendency of people who are insured against a specific hazard to cease to exercise caution to avoid the hazard – Encarta World Dictionary 2009)

Jealousy is both reasonable and belongs to reasonable men, while envy is base and belongs to the base, for the one makes himself get good things by jealousy, while the other does not allow his neighbour to have them through envy. – Aristotle

But when the politicians beat their drums and shout that others want to take from the dependents what they now believe to be their right, they unleash an angry mob.  This mob, though they have no true claim on the freedoms or produce of others struck out last week at those they had been told for years the obstacle to their desires.

The worst form of inequality is to try to make unequal things equal.  – Aristotle

All people are not equal in all ways.  We should hope that they never are.  Without our uniqueness we would never enjoy as a society the gifts of music, science, innovation, or discovery.  Likewise, we should seek to be dissatisfied with our current situation and seek to improve it through honest work and virtuous living.

Those who excel in virtue have the best right of all to rebel, but then they are of all men the least inclined to do so.  – Aristotle

There are great and weighty problems facing our world today.  Economies are in disarray due to profligate spending, compounding debt, and undeliverable promises.  Famine, poverty, and disaster stalk the world yet the most generous nations in the world are denigrated and attacked.  Extremist ideologies seek to  gather power and influence; taking advantage by fomenting societal unrest.

We praise a man who feels angry on the right grounds and against the right persons and also in the right manner at the right moment and for the right length of time.  – Aristotle

We have reason to be nervous and uncertain in today’s world.  Uncertainty causes fear and fear is a great driver of human passions.  However, by remaining steadfast to our principles and faith, the world can right itself.  Reasonable men can forge a path through the turbulence and put us back on the path equality of opportunity for all.  The promise of equal outcome for all is what got us here today.

Republics decline into democracies and democracies degenerate into despotisms.  – Aristotle

All should hope that this last observation of Aristotle’s serves as sufficient warning for us to avoid its dreadful outcome.

(See my Friday August 12th post “On Riots And Self-Defense…” )

On Riots And Self-Defense…

Our founding fathers looked across the oceans and the ages to assemble the philosophy on which this great nation would be built upon.  First they looked to their own Christian heritage for the authority for self-rule.  From there they examined the civilizations of the Greeks and Romans and their own european homelands to develop a form of governance that has become the longest standing republic known to man.  They enumerated these principles in our founding documents – the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States.  Finally, the people then acted on these ideas and our nation as we know it came into being.

Our principles are reinforced by laws.  These laws are written down so that reasonable persons can have certainty in the conduct of their every day lives.  Contracts will be enforceable, our liberties protected, and order will be maintained.  If another person breaks the rules our society has established we have the right to seek protection and redress through our legal system.  However, that right of redress does nothing to abrogate the natural right of self-defense.  In the immediacy of the moment we have the inalienable right to protect our lives and our property.  The Founders had observed this principle in action through English common law and then the written 1689 Declaration of Rights.

John Adams rightly stated during his 1770 defense of the English troops on trial for the Boston Massacre…

“We talk of liberty and property, but, if we cut up the law of self-defence, we cut up the foundation of both, and if we give up this, the rest is of very little value, and therefore, this principle must be strictly attended to… if a robber meets me in the street, and commands me to surrender my purse, I have a right to kill him without asking questions; if a person commits a bare assault on me, this will not justify killing, but if he assaults me in such a manner, as to discover an intention to kill me, I have a right to destroy him.”

What we see in the riots occurring in England today is a failure on two levels.  First, the government and police are failing to prosecute criminals in so many cases that there is little fear of real consequences.  When society will not uphold its laws then the members of that society loses confidence in all aspects of that government.  By failing to uphold their portion of the social contract he government has lost its legitimate authority to rule in the name of the people it is supposed to protect.

Secondly, the government’s incremental elimination of its citizen’s natural right of self-defense makes criminals of honest men.  How can one have faith in governmental institutions that wont protect your life or property but then would take away your freedom for defending it?  If you are not allowed to protect your freedoms and liberties then you have none.

These riots in England (and Greece and France as well) are symptomatic of what occurs as government is allowed to control more and more of our individual lives.  The mobs of self-entitled miscreants protesting for more largess from the productive class of society are the “squeaky wheel”.  To quiet the mob the socialist elements of government will press for more support or aid for these downtrodden unfortunates.   Meanwhile, to pay for this generosity, the law-abiding citizens who lost property and were injured will be burdened with the taxes and debt to pay for it.

There have been some small instances of mob violence in America recently.  The approach that the government takes towards the criminals versus law-abiding citizens acting in their own defense will show us how far this nation has fallen from its founding principles.  We are a nation of laws, not of men.  However, when the government can’t or won’t enforce the law, we have the natural right as men to defend our lives and our property.  Pray that our leaders find the strength and courage to live up to their end of our social construct.  If they don’t, the Declaration of Independence is instructive as to the path we may take…

Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

London riots erupt - Lewis Whyld / AP

The Herd

The Herd – Posted to MySpace May 21, 2008 at 10:56pm

How much of this country can we give away?  All I am hearing during this presidential election cycle is “we’re gonna give you this” and  “everyone should have that”.

First principles… America was founded on ‘freedom to’ not ‘freedom from’.

You have the freedom to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.  You do NOT have the right to not be offended.  You do NOT have the right to live without responsibilities.  You do NOT have the right to make other people feel or share your pain.  Hell, these aren’t even worthwhile aspirations.  These are symptoms of the democratic disease.

When the founders of this country spoke of democracy it was with all the disdain they could muster.  Democracy is weak and selfish.  Democracy is the lynch mob.  The few with loud voices can call a herd and guide it with their hate, greed, and envy all for their own sense of power and importance.Governance is a deliberative process.  Knee-jerk reactions to the baying of the mob only ensure that many more of us will find ourselves kicked in the nethers by that same knee.

The representatives of the people can bring the causes and concerns of their constituents before their fellow legislators and debate the merits of the issues.  However, where is the check on this feeding-frenzy?  In the early days of this nation the Senate represented the interests of the individual states and provided a real check on the overgrowth of our federal government.  To ensure that these senators represented their states, each state had the ability to determine how these senators were to be chosen.  Some were selected by the state legislatures, some appointed by their governors, and yes, a few were directly elected.

However, after the civil war, the constitution was amended to force senators to be elected directly by the populations of their respective states.  The result of this has been an exponential growth in the federal government as the states have had no advocate in the halls of congress.  Both houses are now filled with the vainglorious and power-hungry who only advocate for their own reelection.

So, democracy is now the rule and not the nightmare.  The public has figured out that they can vote for ‘freedom from’ instead of working with ‘freedom to’.  They have voted themselves a trough from which they can feed and feed and feed.  Forget that the meal has to be made by someone.  Damn the ever shrinking number of cooks and farmers and all the rest that work to make the food.  The herd has discovered that their feed is in the ballot box.