Tag Archives: Star Spangled Banner

Lost and Found – September 13th Edition

What to remember about September 13th…

    • 1814  Francis Scott Key watches 25-hour bombardment of Ft. McHenry during War of 1812; writes poem that will become “The Star Spangled Banner
    • 1851  U.S. Amy physician Major Walter Reed is born; his discovery of transmission of Yellw Fever by mosquitos allowed completion of the Panama Canal
    • 1862  Union troops discover the Confederate battle plan for Antietam in trash of an evacuated campsite; General McClellan dawdles
    • 1922  Hottest day on record when the temperature at Al ‘Aziziyah, Libya reaches 136.0 °F (57.8 °C)
    • 1959  USSR reaches on the Moon with unmanned Luna 2 spacecraft
    • 1971  Prison riot at Attica, New York ends with 39 dead
    • 1993  Representatives of Israel and Palestine meet at the White House and sign “Declaration of Principles”; 1st agreement between the 2 sides towards ending their conflict
    • 1996  Hip hop star Tupac Shakur dies in a Las Vegas drive-by shooting

Fort Mchenry Flag at the Smithsonian

You might be a redneck if…

You might be a redneck if: It never occurred to you to be
offended by the phrase, ‘One nation, under God..’

You might be a redneck if: You’ve never protested about seeing
the 10 Commandments posted in public places.

You might be a redneck if: You still say ‘ Christmas’
instead of ‘Winter Festival.’

You might be a redneck if: You bow your head when
someone prays.

You might be a redneck if: You stand and place your hand
over your heart when they play the National Anthem


You might be a redneck if:
You treat our armed forces veterans
with great respect, and always have.

You might be a redneck if: You’ve never burned an American
flag, nor intend to.

You might be a redneck if: You know what you believe and
you aren’t afraid to say so, no matter who is listening.

You might be a redneck if: You respect your elders and raised
your kids to do the same.

You might be a redneck if: You’d give your last dollar to a friend.

I guess I’m a Redneck.  God Bless the USA !

 

Lost and Found – September 13th Edition

What to remember about September 13th…

  • 1814  Francis Scott Key watches 25-hour bombardment of Ft. McHenry during War of 1812; writes poem that will become “The Star Spangled Banner
  • 1851  U.S. Amy physician Major Walter Reed is born; his discovery of transmission of Yellow Fever by mosquitos allowed completion of the Panama Canal
  • 1862  Union troops discover the Confederate battle plan for Antietam in trash of an evacuated campsite; General McClellan dawdled
  • 1922  Hottest day on record when the temperature at Al ‘Aziziyah, Libya reaches 136.0 °F (57.8 °C)
  • 1959  USSR reaches on the Moon with unmanned Luna 2 spacecraft
  • 1971  Prison riot at Attica, New York ends with 39 dead
  • 1993  Representatives of Israel and Palestine meet at the White House and sign “Declaration of Principles”; 1st agreement between the 2 sides towards ending their conflict
  • 1996  Hip hop star Tupac Shakur dies in a Las Vegas drive-by shooting
  • 2001  Civilian aircraft traffic in U.S. resumes after September 11th attacks

Fort Mchenry Flag at the Smithsonian

Lost and Found – August 1st Edition

What to remember about August 1st…

  • 1779  Francis Scott Key is born (d. 1843); lawyer and lyricist who wrote poem that becomes “Star Spangled Banner
  • 1819  American novelist Herman Melville born (d. 1891); author of Moby Dick
  • 1834  Slavery is abolished in the British Empire
  • 1864  Ulysses S. Grant appoints General Phillip Sheridan commander of the Army of the Shenandoah
  • 1876  Colorado admitted to the Union as 38th state
  • 1907  1st Scout camp on Brownsea Island begins; celebrated as origin of the worldwide Scouting movement
  • 1943  Patrol boat PT-109 commanded by Lieutenant John F. Kennedy destroyed; surviving crew shipwrecked and adrift
  • 1944  Polish resistance begins Warsaw uprising; hope to liberate the city before Soviet army arrives and gives power to communists
  • 1966  Sniper Charles Whitman opens fire from the top of a tower at the University of Texas; 14 killed and 31 wounded
  • 1981  MTV broadcasts its first show
  • 2007  I-35W bridge crossing the Mississippi River at Minneapolis, Minnesota collapses during rush hour

Lost and Found – March 3rd Edition

What to remember about March 3rd…

  • 1776  Connecticut delegate Silas Deane leaves for secret mission in France; negotiates for arms, ammunition and equipment
  • 1820  Congress passes Missouri Compromise; delays conflict over slavery until tensions force repeal with 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act
  • 1845  Congress employs power to override Presidential veto for 1st time
  • 1845  Florida is admitted to the Union as the 27th state
  • 1847  Scientist, inventor, and entrepreneur Alexander Graham Bell is born in Edinburgh, Scotland (d. 1922)
  • 1863  Congress passes act creating the 1st wartime draft to be implemented in U.S. history; 1812 conscription act never put into effect
  • 1865  President Lincoln signs bill creating Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands; distributes relief to former slaves
  • 1887  Anne Sullivan begins teaching 6-year-old Hellen Keller;  “miracle worker” teaches deaf and blind girl to communicate
  • 1931  President Hoover signs bill making “The Star-Spangled Banner” the official national anthem of the United States

  • 1952  Supreme Court upholds New York law prohibiting persons who promote the overthrow of the federal government from teaching
  • 1980  Worlds 1st operational nuclear submarine USS Nautilus is decommissioned after nearly 30 years; now on display in Groton, Connecticut
  • 1991  After leading police on car chase, parolee Rodney King is stopped and beaten and taunted by Los Angeles police; incident is caught on film and leads to arrests, trial, lawsuits, and rioting
  • 2005  American businessman and adventurer Stephen Fossett completes 1st solo, nonstop, unrefueled, circumnavigation of the globe by a fixed-wing aircraft aboard Virgin Atlantic Global Flyer; flight began February 28th

You might be a redneck if…

You might be a redneck if: It never occurred to you to be
offended by the phrase, ‘One nation, under God..’

You might be a redneck if: You’ve never protested about seeing
the 10 Commandments posted in public places.

You might be a redneck if: You still say ‘ Christmas’
instead of ‘Winter Festival.’

You might be a redneck if: You bow your head when
someone prays.

You might be a redneck if: You stand and place your hand
over your heart when they play the National Anthem


You might be a redneck if:
You treat our armed forces veterans
with great respect, and always have.

You might be a redneck if: You’ve never burned an American
flag, nor intend to.

You might be a redneck if: You know what you believe and
you aren’t afraid to say so, no matter who is listening.

You might be a redneck if: You respect your elders and raised
your kids to do the same.

You might be a redneck if: You’d give your last dollar to a friend.

I guess I’m a Redneck.  God Bless the USA !

(Thanks to Herta for sharing this with me)

Lost and Found – March 3rd Edition

What to remember about March 3rd…

  • 1776  Connecticut delegate Silas Deane leaves for secret mission in France; negotiates for arms, ammunition and equipment
  • 1820  Congress passes Missouri Compromise; delays conflict over slavery until tensions force repeal with 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act
  • 1845  Congress employs power to override Presidential veto for 1st time
  • 1845  Florida is admitted to the Union as the 27th state
  • 1847  Scientist, inventor, and entrepreneur Alexander Graham Bell is born in Edinburgh, Scotland (d. 1922)
  • 1863  Congress passes act creating the 1st wartime draft to be implemented in U.S. history; 1812 conscription act never put into effect
  • 1865  President Lincoln signs bill creating Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands; distributes relief to former slaves
  • 1887  Anne Sullivan begins teaching 6-year-old Hellen Keller;  “miracle worker” teaches deaf and blind girl to communicate
  • 1931  President Hoover signs bill making “The Star-Spangled Banner” the official national anthem of the United States

  • 1952  Supreme Court upholds New York law prohibiting persons who promote the overthrow of the federal government from teaching
  • 1980  Worlds 1st operational nuclear submarine USS Nautilus is decommissioned after nearly 30 years; now on display in Groton, Connecticut
  • 1991  After leading police on car chase, parolee Rodney King is stopped and beaten and taunted by Los Angeles police; incident is caught on film and leads to arrests, trial, lawsuits, and rioting
  • 2005  American businessman and adventurer Stephen Fossett completes 1st solo, nonstop, unrefueled, circumnavigation of the globe by a fixed-wing aircraft aboard Virgin Atlantic Global Flyer; flight began February 28th

The Star Spangled Banner

On September 13, 1814, 35-year-old Georgetown lawyer and amateur poet Frances Scott Key boarded a flag-of-truce vessel in Baltimore harbor to negotiate the release of a detained American physician.  However, as the British attacks on Baltimore and Fort McHenry were imminent, they detained Key to prevent him from revealing details of their preparations.  On the evening of September 13th to the early morning of the 14th he had a “sweeping” view of the battle from the British warship.

Bombardment of Fort Henry 1814

That morning, “By the dawn’s early light,” Key could see the  torn, singed, and shell-shot flag still flying above the walls of the defending fort.  Inspired by what he was witnessing, Key scribbled the first verses of his poem onto the back of a letter in his pocket.  Upon returning to Baltimore on the 16th, he completed the poem in his room at the Indian Queen hotel and titled the work the “Defence of Fort McHenry”.  After having it printed in broadsheet form, the piece became an instant hit.  Over a dozen newspapers from Georgia to New Hampshire reprinted it.

Defence of Fort McHenry Broadside 1814

Key and his brother-in-law had put the poem together with the melody of an existing song called “The Anacreontic Song” by English composer John Stafford Smith.  Soon after, Thomas Carr of the Carr Music Store in Baltimore published the words and music together under a new title – “The Star-Spangled Banner”.   The song was performed in public for the first time in October by Baltimore actor Ferdinand Durang at Captain McCauley’s tavern.  The popularity of the piece grew to become a runaway success.

At this time, America had no national anthem.  At official functions, “Hail, Columbia” was played while “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee” served as a default anthem.  With it’s rising popularity, “The Star-Spangled Banner” was frequently played at patriotic events such as July 4th.

At the start of the American Civil War, physician and author Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. added a fifth stanza to the song. It expressed his outrage over secession and his support of the Union.   His son, future Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., had enlisted for the Union and would be wounded in battle 3 times.

When our land is illumined with liberty’s smile,
If a foe from within strikes a blow at her glory,
Down, down with the traitor that tries to defile
The flag of the stars, and the page of her story!
By the millions unchained,
Who their birthright have gained
We will keep her bright blazon forever unstained;
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave,
While the land of the free is the home of the brave.

 In 1889,the Secretary of the Navy signed General Order #374, making “The Star-Spangled Banner” the official music to be played at the raising of the flag.  In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson ordered that “The Star-Spangled Banner” be played at appropriate government and military occasions.  He also ordered the Bureau of Education develop a singular, standard version.  Five eminent musicians were enlisted to agree upon an arrangement – among them the famous composer and band leader John Phillip Souza.  However, in 1929 Robert Ripley observed in his syndicated cartoon “Ripley’s Believe It Or Not” that America still had no official national anthem.  This led to President Herbert Hoover signing a law March 3, 1931 adopting “The Star-Spangled Banner” as the national anthem of the United States of America.

When the national anthem is played, United States Code, 36 U.S.C. § 301 states:

Conduct During Playing.— During a rendition of the national anthem—

(1) when the flag is displayed—

(A) individuals in uniform should give the military salute at the first note of the anthem and maintain that position until the last note;

 (B) members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute in the manner provided for individuals in uniform; and

 (C) all other persons present should face the flag and stand at attention with their right hand over the heart, and men not in uniform, if applicable, should remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart; and

 (2) when the flag is not displayed, all present should face toward the music and act in the same manner they would if the flag were displayed.

To learn more you should visit the Smithsonian Institution’s online Star-Spangled Banner exhibition covering the history of the flag and the song.  There is also a great video by David Barton of Wallbuilders.  It is short but very thorough.

The star-spangled banner itself is 30-by-34-foot flag and is the largest battle flag in existence.   The flag that survived a night of rocket attacks and artillery shelling is currently on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

Star Spangled Banner-1914 centennial-display

A few different renditions of the American national anthem “The Star-Spangled Banner”:

Lost and Found – September 13th Edition

What to remember about September 13th…

Friday the 13th

  • 1814  Francis Scott Key watches 25-hour bombardment of Ft. McHenry during War of 1812; writes poem that will become “The Star Spangled Banner
  • 1851  U.S. Amy physician Major Walter Reed is born; his discovery of transmission of Yellow Fever by mosquitos allowed completion of the Panama Canal
  • 1862  Union troops discover the Confederate battle plan for Antietam in trash of an evacuated campsite; General McClellan dawdled
  • 1922  Hottest day on record when the temperature at Al ‘Aziziyah, Libya reaches 136.0 °F (57.8 °C)
  • 1959  USSR reaches on the Moon with unmanned Luna 2 spacecraft
  • 1971  Prison riot at Attica, New York ends with 39 dead
  • 1993  Representatives of Israel and Palestine meet at the White House and sign “Declaration of Principles”; 1st agreement between the 2 sides towards ending their conflict
  • 1996  Hip hop star Tupac Shakur dies in a Las Vegas drive-by shooting
  • 2001  Civilian aircraft traffic in U.S. resumes after September 11th attacks

Fort Mchenry Flag at the Smithsonian

Lost and Found – August 1st Edition

What to remember about August 1st…

  • 1779  Francis Scott Key is born (d. 1843); lawyer and lyricist who wrote poem that becomes “Star Spangled Banner
  • 1819  American novelist Herman Melville born (d. 1891); author of Moby Dick
  • 1834  Slavery is abolished in the British Empire
  • 1864  Ulysses S. Grant appoints General Phillip Sheridan commander of the Army of the Shenandoah
  • 1876  Colorado admitted to the Union as 38th state
  • 1907  1st Scout camp on Brownsea Island begins; celebrated as origin of the worldwide Scouting movement
  • 1943  Patrol boat PT-109 commanded by Lieutenant John F. Kennedy destroyed; surviving crew shipwrecked
  • 1944  Polish resistance begins Warsaw uprising; hope to liberate the city before Soviet army arrives and gives power to communists
  • 1966  Sniper Charles Whitman opens fire from the top of a tower at the University of Texas; 14 killed and 31 wounded
  • 1981  MTV broadcasts its first show
  • 2007  I-35W bridge crossing the Mississippi River at Minneapolis, Minnesota collapses during rush hour