Tag Archives: Philosophy

Lost and Found – August 25th Edition

What to remember about August 25th…

  • 0325  Convened by Roman Emperor Constantine I, the Council of Nicaea concludes 1st ecumenical debate of the early Christian church
  • 1776  Political philosopher David Hume dies; his essay “Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth” inspires James Madison and others about ideal government
  • 1835 New York Sun newspaper publishes series of articles detailing discovery of life on the moon; known as The Great Moon Hoax
  • 1914  German troops loot and burn Catholic University of Louvain, the town, and its priceless renaissance library
  • 1918  American conductor, composer, and musician Leonard Bernstein is born in Lawrence, Massachusetts
  • 1939  Classic American movie The Wizard of Oz opens in theater
  • 1944  After 4 years of Nazi occupation, Paris is liberated by American and French forces; formal German surrender of city the next day
  • 1945  American missionary and liaison to chinese resistance fighters  in China, John Birch, is murdered by communists; considered “the first casualty of the cold war”
  • 1950  President Truman orders the U.S. Army to take control of railroads ahead of a planned strike by workers
  • 2009  Senator Edward “Ted” Kennedy, “liberal lion of the Senate”, dies of brain cancer at home in Massachusetts
  • 2012  Apollo 11 aastronaut , test pilot, and U.S. Naval Aviator Neil Armstrong dies (b. 1930), 1st man to walk on the moon

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Lost and Found – August 25th Edition

What to remember about August 25th…

  • 0325  Convened by Roman Emperor Constantine I, the Council of Nicaea concludes 1st ecumenical debate of the early Christian church
  • 1776  Political philosopher David Hume dies; his essay “Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth” inspires James Madison and others about ideal government
  • 1835 New York Sun newspaper publishes series of articles detailing discovery of life on the moon; known as The Great Moon Hoax
  • 1914  German troops loot and burn Catholic University of Louvain, the town, and its priceless renaissance library
  • 1918  American conductor, composer, and musician Leonard Bernstein is born in Lawrence, Massachusetts
  • 1939  Classic American movie The Wizard of Oz opens in theater
  • 1944  After 4 years of Nazi occupation, Paris is liberated by American and French forces; formal German surrender of city the next day
  • 1945  American missionary and liaison to chinese resistance fighters  in China, John Birch, is murdered by communists; considered “the first casualty of the cold war”
  • 1950  President Truman orders the U.S. Army to take control of railroads ahead of a planned strike by workers
  • 2009  Senator Edward “Ted” Kennedy, “liberal lion of the Senate”, dies of brain cancer at home in Massachusetts
  • 2012  Apollo 11 aastronaut , test pilot, and U.S. Naval Aviator Neil Armstrong dies (b. 1930), 1st man to walk on the moon

Lost and Found – March 7th Edition

What to remember about March 7th…

  • 1274  Dominican priest and philosopher Thomas Aquinas dies (b. 1225)
  • 1876  29-year-old Alexander Graham Bell receives patent for telephone
  • 1933  Charles Darrow receives copyright for Monopoly game
  • 1936  Violating the Treaty of Versailles, Hitler orders German military to move into Rhineland; demilitarized zone on French border
  • 1950  Soviet union denies that German-born British physicist Klaus Fuchs stole Nuclear secrets for them
  • 1994  SCOTUS rules that parodies of original work are “fair use”
  • 1999  American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick dies (b. 1928); award-winning creator of 2001, A Clockwork Orange; Dr. Strangelove, and Spartacus

The Truth Is Out There

Liberals claim that we all have our own truths.  They use this assertion as an excuse for multitudinous perfidities from socialism to euthanasia.  Bill Whittle puts the lie to their self-serving deception in his latest video.  The objective truth about life is out there for thinking, reasoning, honest seekers.  Watch and learn.

 

Social Progress Doesn’t Guarantee Moral Progress

Walter Russell Mead strikes the nail squarely on the head again with his latest article “From Norway To Hell” :

“There are some trying to draw some political conclusion about left and right from the massacre; I would like to go deeper. This tragedy doesn’t just speak to the state of cultural politics in our time, or remind us (as it surely does) that evil has a home in every human culture and human heart; it challenges some of our deepest beliefs about where the world is headed.”

Evil is an unfortunate side-effect of human free will.  However, to excise our right to choose right from wrong would be an even greater evil.

(Hat tip to Instapundit)

The Beast

The Beast – Posted on MySpace February 13th, 2009 at 2:24 am

As I peer deeper and deeper into the financial morass that now spreads before us, I am reminded of a quote by Friedrich Nietzsche… “Whoever battles monsters should take care not to become a monster too, for if you stare long enough into the Abyss, the Abyss stares also into you.”  This is the situation that confronted and overwhelmed the Republican Congress beginning in 2000. They had fought the socialist monster and its spendthrift ways only to eventually embrace them as their memories and convictions failed. They had tasted the forbidden fruit of power and sold their political souls for individual gain. This selfishness weakened their cause until the real monster once again reared its gloating head and devoured its misbegotten progeny.

Today we face great economic difficulties. Rising joblessness, home foreclosure rates, and bank instability are compounded with falling earnings, a weakened dollar, and great consumer unrest. These are measurable weaknesses whose causes and cures economists can debate endlessly and without surety or consensus. Despite the dire nature of these circumstances, these sad and distressing facts are not what truly endangers us as free people.

In its earliest days, America was dreamed of first and foremost as a land of freedom. The opportunity to begin again, to be treated equally and fairly, to find all the success that our natural talents and will would afford us was what generations sacrificed to achieve, live out, and protect. No one immigrated to this new land for security or handouts or codling. Immigration was for a chance, or even a hope of a chance at a better life through the opportunities to be found here.

Today, the average American has had that desire for freedom bred or educated out of them. We are a culture that envies and covets what we don’t have and despises those that have actually worked to achieve something greater than their fellows. Culturally we worship celebrity and vulgarity while mocking ethics and morality and industriousness. Society rewards sloth and selfishness by ignoring consequences and subsidizing failure. This state we find ourselves in shows not only that we have wandered from the path that led to America’s foundation, we have turned our backs on that path.

Government has in the past 100 years done much to cultivate and encourage the trends that have led us here. America is reaping the fruits of the politician’s labors while we stand with bile in our throats but no words on our tongues. We now face the prospect of massive generational debt, huge increases in government and union workforces, invasions of our medical privacy, loss of control over our own medical decisions, and the socialization of American industry and banking.

Because of this and other affronts that lie unseen on the horizon, I find that there is a great rage building in me. This rage is a beast being fed by soulless politicians that sell our children’s birthrights before they can take their first breaths. The beast grows in strength when bureaucrats see themselves as tha shepherds of the American citizenry instead of its servants. More fodder feeds the beast when our elected leaders tell us what is good for us and ignore our wishes and concerns. The beast is strong and has grown large as the Beast in Washington has feasted on our freedoms and our fears.

I remember what can happen when you fight monsters, you may become one even in pursuit of victory. With this in mind, I keep my beast caged. I harness it. I will use its strength and its voice to make sure that free Americans know what is happening to them and why. Maybe if enough of us find our beast and resist becoming it, the abyss can be traversed. Maybe we can find our path down into through, and back out into the light. America can find its way back into the light. That light is freedom.