Tag Archives: law

Lost and Found – September 25th Edition

What to remember about September 25th…

  • 1775  Colonial Army Colonel Ethan Allen is captured after failed attack on British-controlled Montreal; sent to England for execution
  • 1789  1st Congress of the United States passes 12 amendments to the Constitution known as the Bill of Rights; 10 of the 12 will be ratified by the states by 1791
  • 1897  American author and Nobel Prize winner William Faulkner is born near Oxford; Mississippi
  • 1919  President Woodrow Wilson suffers a stroke while campaigning for passage of the Treaty of Versailles and U.S. entry into the League of Nations; measure never passes, Wilson is left altered and debilitated
  • 1929  American aviation pioneer and Medal of Honor winner Jimmy Doolittle takes a blind flight; proves that full instrument flying from take off to landing is possible
  • 1942  Swiss police are instructed to deny entry to Jewish refugees
  • 1944  Surviving elements of British 1st Airborne withdraw from the Battle of Arnhem in the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden
  • 1957  300 federal troops force the desegregation Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas after mobs threaten children
  • 1981  Sandra Day O’Connor is sworn in as the 102nd Associate Justice and the first female Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court
  • 1992  12-year-old Gregory Kingsley is granted a divorce from his biological parents by a judge in Orlando, FL

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Lost and Found – September 25th Edition

What to remember about September 25th…

  • 1775  Colonial Army Colonel Ethan Allen is captured after failed attack on British-controlled Montreal; sent to England for execution
  • 1789  1st Congress of the United States passes 12 amendments to the Constitution known as the Bill of Rights; 10 of the 12 will be ratified by the states by 1791
  • 1897  American author and Nobel Prize winner William Faulkner is born near Oxford; Mississippi
  • 1919  President Woodrow Wilson suffers a stroke while campaigning for passage of the Treaty of Versailles and U.S. entry into the League of Nations; measure never passes, Wilson is left altered and debilitated
  • 1929  American aviation pioneer and Medal of Honor winner Jimmy Doolittle takes a blind flight; proves that full instrument flying from take off to landing is possible
  • 1942  Swiss police are instructed to deny entry to Jewish refugees
  • 1944  Surviving elements of British 1st Airborne withdraw from the Battle of Arnhem in the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden
  • 1957  300 federal troops force the desegregation Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas after mobs threaten children
  • 1981  Sandra Day O’Connor is sworn in as the 102nd Associate Justice and the first female Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court
  • 1992  12-year-old Gregory Kingsley is granted a divorce from his biological parents by a judge in Orlando, FL

WI Judge says you have no right to food.

In another startling case of “Judges Gone Wild!”, Wisconsin Judge Patrick J. Fielder issued a clarification to his earlier ruling stating …

“no, Plaintiffs do not have a fundamental right to own and use a dairy cow or a dairy herd;”

 “no, Plaintiffs do not have a fundamental right to consume the milk from their own cow;”

 “no, Plaintiffs do not have a fundamental right to produce and consume the foods of their choice…”

 Elsewhere in his remarks the Judge addresses what he sees as weaknesses in the arguments by the plaintiffs even though they build on established Supreme Court precedents such as…

  • Lawrence v. Texas – right to privacy in your home
  •  Stanley v. Georgia – right to private, consensual conduct
  • Cruzan v. Dir, Mo Dep’t of Health – right to refuse medical treatment
  • Roe v. Wade – right to privacy in your own person
  •  and even the recent Heller v. Doe by Doe – acknowledgement of fundamental rights

The plaintiffs own cows.  They milk the cows.  They prefer to drink raw milk from the cows because they believe it to be healthier in some important aspects than pasteurized milk.  They share their views with others.  What the state of Wisconsin (successfully it seems) argued is that if you raise a cow, you have no right to control how you use the cow or its products.  If you have a food product, the government can decide if you own it – for if you have no right exercise control over the use of an item, then you do not own it.

The money quote from foodrenegade.com is

“Sometimes I think I’ve woken up in a surreal alternate reality. I was raised in a patriotic glow where the right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” was a well-defined, well-reasoned expectation. America is the “land of the free.” I do not think this means what I once thought it meant, particularly if we have no fundamental right to drink the milk from our own cows.”

Next we’ll hear that we don’t have a fundamental right to eat that cold slice of pizza leftover from last night because some bureaucrat says it’s bad for me. To paraphrase outspoken opponent of Adolf Hitler and Protestant Pastor and Martin Niemöller

First they came my milk, and I did not speak out —
Because I had no cereal.

Then they came for the toast, and I did not speak out —
Because I had no butter.

Then they came for my pizza — and they left no beer for me either.

What’s next?

(Hat Tip to the Instapundit)