Tag Archives: jimmy doolittle

Lost and Found – December 14th Edition

What to remember about December 14th…

  • 1777  Irish-American patriot Thomas Conway is appointed Inspector General of United States by Continental Congress
  • 1799  America mourns; General George Washington, 1st American president, dies at home in Mount Vernon (b. 1732)
  • 1896  USAF General and Medal of Honor recipient James Harold “Jimmy” Doolittle is born in Alameda, California (d. 1993)
  • 1819  Alabama admitted to the Union as 22nd state
  • 1863  President Lincoln grants amnesty to his sister-in-law Emilie Todd Helm; widow of Confederate General Benjamin Helm
  • 1903  Orville Wright’s 1st attempt at powered flight fails; crash damages aircraft and delays next attempt by 3 days
  • 1911  Team led by Norwegian Roald Amundsen becomes 1st to reach South Pole
  • 1972  Astronaut Eugene Cernan is last human to walk on the moon as Apollo 17 mission prepares to return to Earth
  • 2008  During press conference, Iraqi journalist Muntadhar al-Zaidi shouts “This is a farewell kiss from the Iraqi people, you dog” and throws his shoes at President George W. Bush
  • 2012  Mentally disturbed and unmedicated 20-year old Adam Lanza kills his mother and then attacks Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut; 20 children and 6 adults killed with illegally obtained firearms.  Coward commits suicide before police enter the school.

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Warbirds – B-25 Mitchell Medium Bomber

August 19th marks the anniversary of the 1940 first flight of the storied B-25 Mitchell bomber.  Named for pioneering military aviator General Billy Mitchell, nearly 10,000 of these Warbirds were built.  Variations included medium bomber, weather reconnaissance, ground attack, anti-submarine warfare, and VIP transport.

During WWII, Mitchells would see service all over the globe.  The skies over Europe, the Middle East, Italy, and the Far East would be darkened by the B-25 thousands and thousands of times.  Air Forces that would fly this aircraft would include the U.S Army, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy, British, Canadian, Australian, Dutch, Soviet, Chinese, Brazilian, and Free French.

In the war in Europe, Mitchells supported ground troops from the Battle of El Alamein to D-Day.  After the successful landings in Normandy, squadrons of B-25s would be relocated to airfields in France and Belgium to support forces as they fought towards Berlin.

But, this Warbird earned her greatest fame with the daring Doolittle Raid of Tokyo on April 18, 1942.  16 aircraft took off from the pitching and rolling deck of the USS Hornet (CV-8) over 700 miles from the Japanese mainland.  They delivered their payloads without loss and then proceeded towards China with hopes of reaching safe territory.  Running low on fuel, most of the craft ditched.  Some of the crew were killed while others were taken prisoner by the Japanese.  All were considered heroes for having taken the war to the Japanese – shattering their invincible self-image.  The story of the Doolittle raid was made into the film Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo starring Spencer Tracy, Van Johnson and Robert Mitchum.

Original footage of the 1942 Doolittle Tokyo Air Raid.

Another notable incident in the Mitchell’s history is the 1945 Empire State Building crash.  On July 28, 1945, a B-25D on a personnel run from Boston flew into the building in heavy fog.  The three crew and 11 others died in the crash.  This incident led to the decision to engineer the World Trade Center to withstand the impact of a Boeing 707.  Unfortunately, the aircraft that hit the towers on September 11, 2001 had significantly higher masses and were travelling much faster than the 1960’s simulations took into account.

Specifications, history, and details of the Doolittle Raid in this video.

Archive video footage of the Doolittle Raid.

Lost and Found – April 18th Edition

What to remember about April 18th…

  • 1521  Martin Luther defies Holy Roman Emperor Charles V by refusing to recant his writings during his trial for heresy
  • 1775  British troops march out of Boston to confiscate the American arsenal at Concord and to capture Patriot leaders at Lexington; Patriots Paul Revere and William Dawes set out on horseback from the city to warn Samuel Adams and John Hancock
  • 1864  Confederate troops overwhelm Union supply train guarded by all black 1st Kansas Infantry; no black soldier left alive by rebel troops
  • 1906  At 5:13 a.m., an 8.0 earthquake strikes San Francisco, California; 3000 will die in from subsequent fires and 30,000 buildings lost
  • 1912  705 survivors of lost RMS Titanic arrive back in New York
  • 1923  Yankee Stadium opens in New York City; the “house that Ruth built” will be home to the team until 2008
  • 1942  Lieutenant Colonel James “Jimmy” Doolittle leads raid 1st ever raid of Japanese mainland; 16 B-25 Mitchell bombers launched secretly from aircraft carrier USS Hornet; all bombers lost afterwards and 3 crew killed
  • 1945  Pulitzer Prize winning American war correspondent Ernie Pyle is killed by Japanese machine gun fire on Le Shima, Okinawa in the Pacific (b. 1900)
  • 1955  While preparing speech to celebrate 7th anniversary of State of Israel, German-American physicist Albert Einstein dies (b. 1879)
  • 1961  President Kennedy denies U.S. involvement in failed Bay of Pigs invasion of communist Cuba
  • 1983  Muslim homicide bomber kills 63 in attack on U.S. embassy in Beirut, Lebanon; pro-Iranian Islamic Jihad branch of Hezbollah responsible
  • 1988  In response to Iranian mining of Persian Gulf and damage to USS Roberts, U.S. Navy begins Operation Praying Mantis as retaliation
  • 2007  Supreme Court of the United States upholds Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003 in Gonzales v. Carhart

Lost and Found – December 14th Edition

What to remember about December 14th…

  • 1777  Irish-American patriot Thomas Conway is appointed Inspector General of United States by Continental Congress
  • 1799  America mourns; General George Washington, 1st American president, dies at home in Mount Vernon (b. 1732)
  • 1896  USAF General and Medal of Honor recipient James Harold “Jimmy” Doolittle is born in Alameda, California (d. 1993)
  • 1819  Alabama admitted to the Union as 22nd state
  • 1863  President Lincoln grants amnesty to his sister-in-law Emilie Todd Helm; widow of Confederate General Benjamin Helm
  • 1903  Orville Wright’s 1st attempt at powered flight fails; crash damages aircraft and delays next attempt by 3 days
  • 1911  Team led by Norwegian Roald Amundsen becomes 1st to reach South Pole
  • 1972  Astronaut Eugene Cernan is last human to walk on the moon as Apollo 17 mission prepares to return to Earth
  • 2008  During press conference, Iraqi journalist Muntadhar al-Zaidi shouts “This is a farewell kiss from the Iraqi people, you dog” and throws his shoes at President George W. Bush

Lost and Found – September 25th Edition

What to remember about September 25th…

  • 1775  Colonial Army Colonel Ethan Allen is captured after failed attack on British-controlled Montreal; sent to England for execution
  • 1789  1st Congress of the United States passes 12 amendments to the Constitution known as the Bill of Rights; 10 of the 12 will be ratified by the states by 1791
  • 1897  American author and Nobel Prize winner William Faulkner is born near Oxford; Mississippi
  • 1919  President Woodrow Wilson suffers a stroke while campaigning for passage of the Treaty of Versailles and U.S. entry into the League of Nations; measure never passes, Wilson is left altered and debilitated
  • 1929  American aviation pioneer and Medal of Honor winner Jimmy Doolittle takes a blind flight; proves that full instrument flying from take off to landing is possible
  • 1942  Swiss police are instructed to deny entry to Jewish refugees
  • 1944  Surviving elements of British 1st Airborne withdraw from the Battle of Arnhem in the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden
  • 1957  300 federal troops force the desegregation Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas after mobs threaten children
  • 1981  Sandra Day O’Connor is sworn in as the 102nd Associate Justice and the first female Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court
  • 1992  12-year-old Gregory Kingsley is granted a divorce from his biological parents by a judge in Orlando, FL

Warbirds – B-25 Mitchell Medium Bomber

August 19th marks the anniversary of the 1940 first flight of the storied B-25 Mitchell bomber.  Named for pioneering military aviator General Billy Mitchell, nearly 10,000 of these Warbirds were built.  Variations included medium bomber, weather reconnaissance, ground attack, anti-submarine warfare, and VIP transport.

During WWII, Mitchells would see service all over the globe.  The skies over Europe, the Middle East, Italy, and the Far East would be darkened by the B-25 thousands and thousands of times.  Air Forces that would fly this aircraft would include the U.S Army, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy, British, Canadian, Australian, Dutch, Soviet, Chinese, Brazilian, and Free French.

In the war in Europe, Mitchells supported ground troops from the Battle of El Alamein to D-Day.  After the successful landings in Normandy, squadrons of B-25s would be relocated to airfields in France and Belgium to support forces as they fought towards Berlin.

But, this Warbird earned her greatest fame with the daring Doolittle Raid of Tokyo on April 18, 1942.  16 aircraft took off from the pitching and rolling deck of the USS Hornet (CV-8) over 700 miles from the Japanese mainland.  They delivered their payloads without loss and then proceeded towards China with hopes of reaching safe territory.  Running low on fuel, most of the craft ditched.  Some of the crew were killed while others were taken prisoner by the Japanese.  All were considered heroes for having taken the war to the Japanese – shattering their invincible self-image.  The story of the Doolittle raid was made into the film Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo starring Spencer Tracy, Van Johnson and Robert Mitchum.

Original footage of the 1942 Doolittle Tokyo Air Raid.

Another notable incident in the Mitchell’s history is the 1945 Empire State Building crash.  On July 28, 1945, a B-25D on a personnel run from Boston flew into the building in heavy fog.  The three crew and 11 others died in the crash.  This incident led to the decision to engineer the World Trade Center to withstand the impact of a Boeing 707.  Unfortunately, the aircraft that hit the towers on September 11, 2001 had significantly higher masses and were travelling much faster than the 1960’s simulations took into account.

Specifications, history, and details of the Doolittle Raid in this video.

Archive video footage of the Doolittle Raid.

Lost and Found – April 18th Edition

What to remember about April 18th…

  • 1521  Martin Luther defies Holy Roman Emperor Charles V by refusing to recant his writings during his trial for heresy
  • 1775  British troops march out of Boston to confiscate the American arsenal at Concord and to capture Patriot leaders at Lexington; Patriots Paul Revere and William Dawes set out on horseback from the city to warn Samuel Adams and John Hancock
  • 1864  Confederate troops overwhelm Union supply train guarded by all black 1st Kansas Infantry; no black soldier left alive by rebel troops
  • 1906  At 5:13 a.m., an 8.0 earthquake strikes San Francisco, California; 3000 will die in from subsequent fires and 30,000 buildings lost
  • 1912  705 survivors of lost RMS Titanic arrive back in New York
  • 1923  Yankee Stadium opens in New York City; the “house that Ruth built” will be home to the team until 2008
  • 1942  Lieutenant Colonel James “Jimmy” Doolittle leads raid 1st ever raid of Japanese mainland; 16 B-25 Mitchell bombers launched secretly from aircraft carrier USS Hornet; all bombers lost afterwards and 3 crew killed
  • 1945  Pulitzer Prize winning American war correspondent Ernie Pyle is killed by Japanese machine gun fire on Le Shima, Okinawa in the Pacific (b. 1900)
  • 1955  While preparing speech to celebrate 7th anniversary of State of Israel, German-American physicist Albert Einstein dies (b. 1879)
  • 1961  President Kennedy denies U.S. involvement in failed Bay of Pigs invasion of communist Cuba
  • 1983  Muslim homicide bomber kills 63 in attack on U.S. embassy in Beirut, Lebanon; pro-Iranian Islamic Jihad branch of Hezbollah responsible
  • 1988  In response to Iranian mining of Persian Gulf and damage to USS Roberts, U.S. Navy begins Operation Praying Mantis as retaliation
  • 2007  Supreme Court of the United States upholds Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003 in Gonzales v. Carhart

Lost and Found – December 14th Edition

What to remember about December 14th…

  • 1777  Irish-American patriot Thomas Conway is appointed Inspector General of United States by Continental Congress
  • 1799  America mourns; General George Washington, 1st American president, dies at home in Mount Vernon (b. 1732)
  • 1896  USAF General and Medal of Honor recipient James Harold “Jimmy” Doolittle is born in Alameda, California (d. 1993)
  • 1819  Alabama admitted to the Union as 22nd state
  • 1863  President Lincoln grants amnesty to his sister-in-law Emilie Todd Helm; widow of Confederate General Benjamin Helm
  • 1903  Orville Wright’s 1st attempt at powered flight fails; crash damages aircraft and delays next attempt by 3 days
  • 1911  Team led by Norwegian Roald Amundsen becomes 1st to reach South Pole
  • 1972  Astronaut Eugene Cernan is last human to walk on the moon as Apollo 17 mission prepares to return to Earth
  • 2008  During press conference, Iraqi journalist Muntadhar al-Zaidi shouts “This is a farewell kiss from the Iraqi people, you dog” and throws his shoes at President George W. Bush
  • 2012  20-year old shooter kills mother then goes to Sandy Hook elementary school where she taught; kills six adults and 20 children before taking his own life

Lost and Found – September 25th Edition

What to remember about September 25th…

  • 1775  Colonial Army Colonel Ethan Allen is captured after failed attack on British-controlled Montreal; sent to England for execution
  • 1789  1st Congress of the United States passes 12 amendments to the Constitution known as the Bill of Rights; 10 of the 12 will be ratified by the states by 1791
  • 1897  American author and Nobel Prize winner William Faulkner is born near Oxford; Mississippi
  • 1919  President Woodrow Wilson suffers a stroke while campaigning for passage of the Treaty of Versailles and U.S. entry into the League of Nations; measure never passes, Wilson is left altered and debilitated
  • 1929  American aviation pioneer and Medal of Honor winner Jimmy Doolittle takes a blind flight; proves that full instrument flying from take off to landing is possible
  • 1942  Swiss police are instructed to deny entry to Jewish refugees
  • 1944  Surviving elements of British 1st Airborne withdraw from the Battle of Arnhem in the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden
  • 1957  300 federal troops force the desegregation Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas after mobs threaten children
  • 1981  Sandra Day O’Connor is sworn in as the 102nd Associate Justice and the first female Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court
  • 1992  12-year-old Gregory Kingsley is granted a divorce from his biological parents by a judge in Orlando, FL

Lost and Found – April 18th Edition

What to remember about April 18th…

  • 1521  Martin Luther defies Holy Roman Emperor Charles V by refusing to recant his writings during his trial for heresy
  • 1775  British troops march out of Boston to confiscate the American arsenal at Concord and to capture Patriot leaders at Lexington; Patriots Paul Revere and William Dawes set out on horseback from the city to warn Samuel Adams and John Hancock
  • 1864  Confederate troops overwhelm Union supply train guarded by all black 1st Kansas Infantry; no black soldier left alive by rebel troops
  • 1906  At 5:13 a.m., an 8.0 earthquake strikes San Francisco, California; 3000 will die in from subsequent fires and 30,000 buildings lost
  • 1912  705 survivors of lost RMS Titanic arrive back in New York
  • 1923  Yankee Stadium opens in New York City; the “house that Ruth built” will be home to the team until 2008
  • 1942  Lieutenant Colonel James “Jimmy” Doolittle leads raid 1st ever raid of Japanese mainland; 16 B-25 Mitchell bombers launched secretly from aircraft carrier USS Hornet; all bombers lost afterwards and 3 crew killed
  • 1945  Pulitzer Prize winning American war correspondent Ernie Pyle is killed by Japanese machine gun fire on Le Shima, Okinawa in the Pacific (b. 1900)
  • 1955  While preparing speech to celebrate 7th anniversary of State of Israel, German-American physicist Albert Einstein dies (b. 1879)
  • 1961  President Kennedy denies U.S. involvement in failed Bay of Pigs invasion of communist Cuba
  • 1983  Muslim homicide bomber kills 63 in attack on U.S. embassy in Beirut, Lebanon; pro-Iranian Islamic Jihad branch of Hezbollah responsible
  • 1988  In response to Iranian mining of Persian Gulf and damage to USS Roberts, U.S. Navy begins Operation Praying Mantis as retaliation
  • 2007  Supreme Court of the United States upholds Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003 in Gonzales v. Carhart