Tag Archives: famous quotes

25 Statements On Politics And Government

You can double-check the sourcing on these, but I think I have them right (Those who don’t know history are destined to repeat it. – Edmund Burke)
  1. In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm and three or more is a congress.–John Adams
  2. If you don’t read the newspaper you are uninformed, if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed–Mark Twain
  3. Suppose you were an idiot.. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But then I repeat myself.–Mark Twain
  4. I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.–Winston Churchill
  5. A government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul.–George Bernard Shaw
  6. A liberal is someone who feels a great debt to his fellow man, which debt he proposes to pay off with your money –G. Gordon Liddy
  7. Democracy must be something more than two wolves and a sheep voting on what to have for dinner–James Bovard, Civil Libertarian (1994)
  8. Foreign aid might be defined as a transfer of money from poor people in rich countries to rich people in poor countries.–Douglas Casey (Classmate of Bill Clinton at Georgetown University)
  9. Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys.–P.J. O’Rourke, Civil Libertarian
  10. Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else.–Frederic Bastiat, French economist(1801-1850)
  11. Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it.. If it keeps moving, regulate it.. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.–Ronald Reagan (1986)
  12. I don’t make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts–Will Rogers
  13. If you think health care is expensive now, wait until you see what it costs when it’s free–P.J. O’Rourke
  14. In general, the art of government consists of taking as much money as possible from one party of the citizens to give to the other–Voltaire (1764)
  15. Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn’t mean politics won’t take an interest in you!–Pericles (430 B.C.)
  16. No man’s life, liberty, or property is safe while the legislature is in session.–Mark Twain (1866)
  17. Talk is cheap except when Congress does it.–Anonymous
  18. The government is like a baby’s alimentary canal, with a happy appetite at one end and no responsibility at the other.–Ronald Reagan
  19. The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of the blessings. The inherent blessing of socialism is the equal sharing of misery.–Winston Churchill
  20. The only difference between a tax man and a taxidermist is that the taxidermist leaves the skin.–Mark Twain
  21. The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.–Herbert Spencer, English Philosopher (1820-1903)
  22. There is no distinctly Native American criminal class save Congress–Mark Twain
  23. What this country needs are more unemployed politicians.–Edward Langley, Artist (1928-1995)
  24. A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have.–Thomas Jefferson
  25. We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office.–Aesop

Cicero on balancing the budget

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25 Statements On Politics And Government

You can double-check the sourcing on these, but I think I have them right (Those who don’t know history are destined to repeat it. – Edmund Burke)
  1. In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm and three or more is a congress.–John Adams
  2. If you don’t read the newspaper you are uninformed, if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed–Mark Twain
  3. Suppose you were an idiot.. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But then I repeat myself.–Mark Twain
  4. I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.–Winston Churchill
  5. A government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul.–George Bernard Shaw
  6. A liberal is someone who feels a great debt to his fellow man, which debt he proposes to pay off with your money –G. Gordon Liddy
  7. Democracy must be something more than two wolves and a sheep voting on what to have for dinner–James Bovard, Civil Libertarian (1994)
  8. Foreign aid might be defined as a transfer of money from poor people in rich countries to rich people in poor countries.–Douglas Casey (Classmate of Bill Clinton at Georgetown University)
  9. Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys.–P.J. O’Rourke, Civil Libertarian
  10. Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else.–Frederic Bastiat, French economist(1801-1850)
  11. Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it.. If it keeps moving, regulate it.. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.–Ronald Reagan (1986)
  12. I don’t make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts–Will Rogers
  13. If you think health care is expensive now, wait until you see what it costs when it’s free–P.J. O’Rourke
  14. In general, the art of government consists of taking as much money as possible from one party of the citizens to give to the other–Voltaire (1764)
  15. Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn’t mean politics won’t take an interest in you!–Pericles (430 B.C.)
  16. No man’s life, liberty, or property is safe while the legislature is in session.–Mark Twain (1866)
  17. Talk is cheap except when Congress does it.–Anonymous
  18. The government is like a baby’s alimentary canal, with a happy appetite at one end and no responsibility at the other.–Ronald Reagan
  19. The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of the blessings. The inherent blessing of socialism is the equal sharing of misery.–Winston Churchill
  20. The only difference between a tax man and a taxidermist is that the taxidermist leaves the skin.–Mark Twain
  21. The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.–Herbert Spencer, English Philosopher (1820-1903)
  22. There is no distinctly Native American criminal class save Congress–Mark Twain
  23. What this country needs are more unemployed politicians.–Edward Langley, Artist (1928-1995)
  24. A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have.–Thomas Jefferson
  25. We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office.–Aesop

Cicero on balancing the budget

25 Statements On Politics And Government

You can double-check the sourcing on these, but I think I have them right (Those who don’t know history are destined to repeat it. – Edmund Burke)
  1. In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm and three or more is a congress.–John Adams
  2. If you don’t read the newspaper you are uninformed, if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed–Mark Twain
  3. Suppose you were an idiot.. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But then I repeat myself.–Mark Twain
  4. I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.–Winston Churchill
  5. A government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul.–George Bernard Shaw
  6. A liberal is someone who feels a great debt to his fellow man, which debt he proposes to pay off with your money –G. Gordon Liddy
  7. Democracy must be something more than two wolves and a sheep voting on what to have for dinner–James Bovard, Civil Libertarian (1994)
  8. Foreign aid might be defined as a transfer of money from poor people in rich countries to rich people in poor countries.–Douglas Casey (Classmate of Bill Clinton at Georgetown University)
  9. Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys.–P.J. O’Rourke, Civil Libertarian
  10. Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else.–Frederic Bastiat, French economist(1801-1850)
  11. Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it.. If it keeps moving, regulate it.. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.–Ronald Reagan (1986)
  12. I don’t make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts–Will Rogers
  13. If you think health care is expensive now, wait until you see what it costs when it’s free–P.J. O’Rourke
  14. In general, the art of government consists of taking as much money as possible from one party of the citizens to give to the other–Voltaire (1764)
  15. Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn’t mean politics won’t take an interest in you!–Pericles (430 B.C.)
  16. No man’s life, liberty, or property is safe while the legislature is in session.–Mark Twain (1866)
  17. Talk is cheap except when Congress does it.–Anonymous
  18. The government is like a baby’s alimentary canal, with a happy appetite at one end and no responsibility at the other.–Ronald Reagan
  19. The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of the blessings. The inherent blessing of socialism is the equal sharing of misery.–Winston Churchill
  20. The only difference between a tax man and a taxidermist is that the taxidermist leaves the skin.–Mark Twain
  21. The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.–Herbert Spencer, English Philosopher (1820-1903)
  22. There is no distinctly Native American criminal class save Congress–Mark Twain
  23. What this country needs are more unemployed politicians.–Edward Langley, Artist (1928-1995)
  24. A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have.–Thomas Jefferson
  25. We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office.–Aesop

Cicero on balancing the budget

Thomas Jefferson on Judges

The judiciary is just one co-equal branch of our federal government.  They have been wrong in the past and will be so in the future.  Relying on them for the assurance of your liberty is mere hope.

Here is Jefferson on judges in a letter to William Charles Jarvis written September 28, 1820.

I thank you, Sir, for the copy of your Republican which you have been so kind as to send me, and I should have acknowledged it sooner but that I am just returned home after a long absence. I have not vet had time to read it seriously, but in looking over it cursorily I see much in it to approve, and shall be glad if it shall lead our youth to the practice of thinking on such subjects and for themselves. That it will have this tendency may be expected, and for that reason I feel an urgency to note what I deem an error in it, the more requiring notice as your opinion is strengthened by that of many others. You seem, in pages 84 and 148, to consider the judges as the ultimate arbiters of all constitutional questions; a very dangerous doctrine indeed, and one which would place us under the despotism of an oligarchy. Our judges are as honest as other men, and not more so. They have, with others, the same passions for party, for power, and the privilege of their corps. Their maxim is “boni judicis est ampliare jurisdictionem,” and their power the more dangerous as they are in office for life, and not responsible, as the other functionaries are, to the elective control. The Constitution has erected no such single tribunal, knowing that to whatever hands confided, with the corruptions of time and party, its members would become despots. It has more wisely made all the departments co-equal and co-sovereign within themselves. If the legislature fails to pass laws for a census, for paying the judges and other officers of government, for establishing a militia, for naturalization as prescribed by the Constitution, or if they fail to meet in congress, the judges cannot issue their mandamus to them ; if the President fails to supply the place of a judge, to appoint other civil or military officers, to issue requisite commissions, the judges cannot force him. They can issue their mandamus or distringas to no executive or legislative officer to enforce the fulfilment of their official duties, any more than the President or legislature may issue orders to the judges or their officers. Betrayed by English example, and unaware, as it should seem, of the control of our Constitution in this particular, they have at times overstepped their limit by undertaking to command executive officers in the discharge of their executive duties ; but the Constitution, in keeping three departments distinct and independent, restrains the authority of the judges to judiciary organs, as it does the executive and legislative to executive and legislative organs. The judges certainly have more frequent occasion to act on constitutional questions, because the laws of meum and tuum and of criminal action, forming the great mass of the system of law, constitute their particular department. When the legislative or executive functionaries act unconstitutionally, they are responsible to the people in their elective capacity. The exemption of the judges from that is quite dangerous enough. I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves ; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education. This is the true corrective of abuses of constitutional power. Pardon me, Sir, for this difference of opinion. My personal interest in such questions is entirely extinct, but not my wishes for the longest possible continuance of our government on its pure principles ; if the three powers maintain their mutual independence on each other it may last long, but not so if either can assume the authorities of the other. I ask your candid re-consideration of this subject, and am sufficiently sure you will form a candid conclusion. Accept the assurance of my great respect.

Thomas Jefferson

We feel relieved at the 2nd Amendment ruling in Heller but aghast at the SCOTUS ruling in the Obamacare case.  Never abdicate your fight for good and honest government to others.  Hold your representatives accountable.  Press on through every possible channel to ensure that we not only maintain our rights but also regain those that have been abridged.

thomas jefferson on judges

Quotes For Life – #0001

If you’ve read here long, you know that I have an eclectic taste in reading materials.  I scan and scour everything from political theory and history to cookbooks and the Sunday funny pages.  As I go, I look for the gems; the core idea that the author used hundred of pages to reveal.  I often leave an index card in the book that might list a couple important pages or passages I can quickly refer back to.  Sometimes it comes down to just a quote.

So, I’m going start sharing some famous and not-so-famous quotes here.  For now, this won’t be a daily item per se.  I’d just like to share a few of the gems I have uncovered in my studies.  If you have questions, or better yet a suggestion, please drop me a note.

*****

mark twain on patriotism and government

Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. – Mark Twain

Abridged modern version from speech of Tsar Nicholas II in Mark Twain’s The Czar’s Soliloquy, 1905