Tag Archives: 17th Ammendment

Lost and Found – May 31st Edition

What to remember about May 31st…

  • 1859  Big Ben clock tower rings out over British Houses of Parliament for the 1st time
  • 1879  In New York city Gilmore’s Garden is renamed Madison Square Garden and opened to the public as an entertainment venue
  • 1913  17th Amendment to the United States Constitution goes into effect; requires popular election of Senators eliminating check on federal power
  • 1916  British and German navies begin Battle of Jutland; over 100,000 men and 250 ships will see combat in WWI’s greatest sea battle
  • 1929  Ford Motor Company signs agreement to oversee production of factories and manufacture automobiles in the Soviet Union
  • 1930 Oscar-winning American actor and filmmaker Clint Eastwood is born in San Francisco, California
  • 1962  In Tel Aviv, Israel, Adolf Eichmann, Nazi organizer of Adolf Hitler’s “final solution of the Jewish question,” is hanged
  • 1997  Ila Borders becomes 1st woman to pitch in a minor league baseball game; she enters as relief for the St. Paul Saints
  • 2003  Fugitive bomber of 1996 Atlanta Olympics and several abortion clinics captured; Eric Robert Rudolph found dumpster diving behind a Save-A-Lot store in Murphy, North Carolina
  • 2005  Identity of Watergate scandal source “Deep Throat” is revealed to be formed FBI assistant director W. Mark Felt

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Lost and Found – April 8th Edition

What to remember about April 8th…

  • 1778  John Adams arrives in Paris to join diplomatic mission
  • 1884  Confederate forces halt Union’s Red River campaign to invade Texas from Louisiana with rout at Battle of Mansfield
  • 1895  Supreme Court of the United States declares unapportioned income tax to be unconstitutional in Pollock v. Farmers’ Loan & Trust Co.
  • 1913  With passage in Connecticut, 17th Amendment to the Constitution is ratified; direct election of Senators required by all states
  • 1935  Works Progress Administration is created as Congress passes President Roosevelt’s “New Deal”
  • 1945  Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Lutheran minister and vocal opponent of Hitler, is hanged just days before Flossenberg prison camp liberated by Allies
  • 1954  President Truman orders seizure of all steel mills to avoid strike
  • 1974  African-American baseball player Hank Aaron breaks Babe Ruth’s home run record with his 715th career home run
  • 1994  Body of Nirvana lead singer Kurt Cobain is found of apparent suicide in his home; many fans blame girlfriend Courtney Love for his death
  • 2005  Serial bomber Eric Robert Rudolph agrees to plead guilty in exchange for 4 life sentences; placed bombs at Atlanta Olympics, abortion clinics, and nightclubs and then eluded police for eight years
  • 2013 Baroness Margaret Hilda Thatcher, the “Iron Lady”, Britain’s 1st female Prime Minister dies of a stroke (b. 1925)

Lost and Found – May 31st Edition

What to remember about May 31st…

  • 1859  Big Ben clock tower rings out over British Houses of Parliament for the 1st time
  • 1879  In New York city Gilmore’s Garden is renamed Madison Square Garden and opened to the public as an entertainment venue
  • 1913  17th Amendment to the United States Constitution goes into effect; requires popular election of Senators eliminating check on federal power
  • 1916  British and German navies begin Battle of Jutland; over 100,000 men and 250 ships will see combat in WWI’s greatest sea battle
  • 1929  Ford Motor Company signs agreement to oversee production of factories and manufacture automobiles in the Soviet Union
  • 1930 Oscar-winning American actor and filmmaker Clint Eastwood is born in San Francisco, California
  • 1962  In Tel Aviv, Israel, Adolf Eichmann, Nazi organizer of Adolf Hitler’s “final solution of the Jewish question,” is hanged
  • 1997  Ila Borders becomes 1st woman to pitch in a minor league baseball game; she enters as relief for the St. Paul Saints
  • 2003  Fugitive bomber of Atlanta Olympics and several abortion clinics captured; Eric Robert Rudolph found dumpster diving behind a Save-A-Lot store in Murphy, North Carolina
  • 2005  Identity of Watergate scandal source “Deep Throat” is revealed to be formed FBI assistant director W. Mark Felt

Lost and Found – April 8th Edition

What to remember about April 8th…

  • 1778  John Adams arrives in Paris to join diplomatic mission
  • 1884  Confederate forces halt Union’s Red River campaign to invade Texas from Louisiana with rout at Battle of Mansfield
  • 1895  Supreme Court of the United States declares unapportioned income tax to be unconstitutional in Pollock v. Farmers’ Loan & Trust Co.
  • 1913  With passage in Connecticut, 17th Amendment to the Constitution is ratified; direct election of Senators required by all states
  • 1935  Works Progress Administration is created as Congress passes President Roosevelt’s “New Deal”
  • 1945  Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Lutheran minister and vocal opponent of Hitler, is hanged just days before Flossenberg prison camp liberated by Allies
  • 1954  President Truman orders seizure of all steel mills to avoid strike
  • 1974  African-American baseball player Hank Aaron breaks Babe Ruth’s home run record with his 715th career home run
  • 1994  Body of Nirvana lead singer Kurt Cobain is found of apparent suicide in his home; many fans blame girlfriend Courtney Love for his death
  • 2005  Serial bomber Eric Robert Rudolph agrees to plead guilty in exchange for 4 life sentences; placed bombs at Atlanta Olympics, abortion clinics, and nightclubs and then eluded police for eight years
  • UPDATE:  2013 Baroness Margaret Hilda Thatcher, the “Iron Lady”, Britain’s 1st female Prime Minister dies of a stroke (b. 1925)

Lost and Found – May 31st Edition

What to remember about May 31st…

  • 1859  Big Ben clock tower rings out over British Houses of Parliament for the 1st time
  • 1879  In New York city Gilmore’s Garden is renamed Madison Square Garden and opened to the public as an entertainment venue
  • 1913  17th Amendment to the United States Constitution goes into effect; requires popular election of Senators eliminating check on federal power
  • 1916  British and German navies begin Battle of Jutland; over 100,000 men and 250 ships will see combat in WWI’s greatest sea battle
  • 1929  Ford Motor Company signs agreement to oversee production of factories and manufacture automobiles in the Soviet Union
  • 1930 Oscar-winning American actor and filmmaker Clint Eastwood is born in San Francisco, California
  • 1962  In Tel Aviv, Israel, Adolf Eichmann, Nazi organizer of Adolf Hitler’s “final solution of the Jewish question,” is hanged
  • 1997  Ila Borders becomes 1st woman to pitch in a minor league baseball game; she enters as relief for the St. Paul Saints
  • 2003  Fugitive bomber of Atlanta Olympics and several abortion clinics captured; Eric Robert Rudolph found dumpster diving behind a Save-A-Lot store in Murphy, North Carolina
  • 2005  Identity of Watergate scandal source “Deep Throat” is revealed to be formed FBI assistant director W. Mark Felt

Lost and Found – April 8th Edition

What to remember about April 8th…

  • 1778  John Adams arrives in Paris to join diplomatic mission
  • 1884  Confederate forces halt Union’s Red River campaign to invade Texas from Louisiana with rout at Battle of Mansfield
  • 1895  Supreme Court of the United States declares unapportioned income tax to be unconstitutional in Pollock v. Farmers’ Loan & Trust Co.
  • 1913  With passage in Connecticut, 17th Amendment to the Constitution is ratified; direct election of Senators required by all states
  • 1935  Works Progress Administration is created as Congress passes President Roosevelt’s “New Deal”
  • 1945  Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Lutheran minister and vocal opponent of Hitler, is hanged just days before Flossenberg prison camp liberated by Allies
  • 1954  President Truman orders seizure of all steel mills to avoid strike
  • 1974  African-American baseball player Hank Aaron breaks Babe Ruth’s home run record with his 715th career home run
  • 1994  Body of Nirvana lead singer Kurt Cobain is found of apparent suicide in his home; many fans blame girlfriend Courtney Love for his death
  • 2005  Serial bomber Eric Robert Rudolph agrees to plead guilty in exchange for 4 life sentences; placed bombs at Atlanta Olympics, abortion clinics, and nightclubs and then eluded police for eight years
  • UPDATE:  2013 Baroness Margaret Hilda Thatcher, the “Iron Lady”, Britain’s 1st female Prime Minister dies of a stroke (b. 1925)

Lost and Found – May 31st Edition

What to remember about May 31st…

  • 1859  Big Ben clock tower rings out over British Houses of Parliament for the 1st time
  • 1879  In New York city Gilmore’s Garden is renamed Madison Square Garden and opened to the public as an entertainment venue
  • 1913  17th Amendment to the United States Constitution goes into effect; requires popular election of Senators eliminating check on federal power
  • 1916  British and German navies begin Battle of Jutland; over 100,000 men and 250 ships will see combat in WWI’s greatest sea battle
  • 1929  Ford Motor Company signs agreement to oversee production of factories and manufacture automobiles in the Soviet Union
  • 1930 Oscar-winning American actor and filmmaker Clint Eastwood is born in San Francisco, California
  • 1962  In Tel Aviv, Israel, Adolf Eichmann, Nazi organizer of Adolf Hitler’s “final solution of the Jewish question,” is hanged
  • 1997  Ila Borders becomes 1st woman to pitch in a minor league baseball game; she enters as relief for the St. Paul Saints
  • 2003  Fugitive bomber of Atlanta Olympics and several abortion clinics captured; Eric Robert Rudolph found dumpster diving behind a Save-A-Lot store in Murphy, North Carolina
  • 2005  Identity of Watergate scandal source “Deep Throat” is revealed to be formed FBI assistant director W. Mark Felt

Lost and Found – April 8th Edition

What to remember about April 8th…

 HAPPY EASTER

  • 1778  John Adams arrives in Paris to join diplomatic mission
  • 1884  Confederate forces halt Union’s Red River campaign to invade Texas from Louisiana with rout at Battle of Mansfield
  • 1895  Supreme Court of the United States declares unapportioned income tax to be unconstitutional in Pollock v. Farmers’ Loan & Trust Co.
  • 1913  With passage in Connecticut, 17th Amendment to the Constitution is ratified; direct election of Senators required by all states
  • 1935  Works Progress Administration is created as Congress passes President Roosevelt’s “New Deal”
  • 1945  Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Lutheran minister and vocal opponent of Hitler, is hanged just days before Flossenberg prison camp liberated by Allies
  • 1954  President Truman orders seizure of all steel mills to avoid strike
  • 1974  African-American baseball player Hank Aaron breaks Babe Ruth’s home run record with his 715th career home run
  • 1994  Nirvana lead singer Kurt Cobain is found dead of apparent suicide in his home; many fans blame girlfriend Courtney Love for his death
  • 2005  Serial bomber Eric Robert Rudolph agrees to plead guilty in exchange for 4 life sentences; placed bombs at Atlanta Olympics, abortion clinics, and nightclubs and then eluded police for eight years

The Herd

The Herd – Posted to MySpace May 21, 2008 at 10:56pm

How much of this country can we give away?  All I am hearing during this presidential election cycle is “we’re gonna give you this” and  “everyone should have that”.

First principles… America was founded on ‘freedom to’ not ‘freedom from’.

You have the freedom to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.  You do NOT have the right to not be offended.  You do NOT have the right to live without responsibilities.  You do NOT have the right to make other people feel or share your pain.  Hell, these aren’t even worthwhile aspirations.  These are symptoms of the democratic disease.

When the founders of this country spoke of democracy it was with all the disdain they could muster.  Democracy is weak and selfish.  Democracy is the lynch mob.  The few with loud voices can call a herd and guide it with their hate, greed, and envy all for their own sense of power and importance.Governance is a deliberative process.  Knee-jerk reactions to the baying of the mob only ensure that many more of us will find ourselves kicked in the nethers by that same knee.

The representatives of the people can bring the causes and concerns of their constituents before their fellow legislators and debate the merits of the issues.  However, where is the check on this feeding-frenzy?  In the early days of this nation the Senate represented the interests of the individual states and provided a real check on the overgrowth of our federal government.  To ensure that these senators represented their states, each state had the ability to determine how these senators were to be chosen.  Some were selected by the state legislatures, some appointed by their governors, and yes, a few were directly elected.

However, after the civil war, the constitution was amended to force senators to be elected directly by the populations of their respective states.  The result of this has been an exponential growth in the federal government as the states have had no advocate in the halls of congress.  Both houses are now filled with the vainglorious and power-hungry who only advocate for their own reelection.

So, democracy is now the rule and not the nightmare.  The public has figured out that they can vote for ‘freedom from’ instead of working with ‘freedom to’.  They have voted themselves a trough from which they can feed and feed and feed.  Forget that the meal has to be made by someone.  Damn the ever shrinking number of cooks and farmers and all the rest that work to make the food.  The herd has discovered that their feed is in the ballot box.