Monthly Archives: August 2016

Lost and Found – August 30th Edition

What to remember about August 30th…

    • 1780  Benedict Arnold sends letter to General Clinton agreeing to terms; for £20,000 Arnold would betray his country and deliver West Point and the Hudson to the British
    • 1862  Rebels rout Union forces at Battle of Richmond
    • 1918  Soviet leader Vladimir Lenin shot by Fanya Kaplan but survives; millions will die in the years to follow in pogroms and gulags
    • 1963  “Hotline” is established between Soviet Union and United States to allow crisis communication between their leaders
    • 1967  Thurgood Marshall is confirmed as 1st African-American Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court
    • 1983  On space shuttle Challenger, Lieutenant Colonel Guion S. Bluford (USAF) becomes 1st African-American in space
    • 2003 American tough-guy actor Charles Bronson dies in L.A.
    • 2005  Following Hurricane Katrina, Lake Ponchartrain levees break causing widespread flooding in New Orleans

Lost and Found – August 29th Edition

What to remember about August 29th…

    • 1862  After days of maneuvering the 2nd Battle of Bull Run begins; Confederates win a path to invade the north
    • 1945  President Truman orders the U.S. Navy to seize control of oil refineries and transportation to break strike by union workers
    • 1949  Soviet Union successfully detonates its 1st atomic bomb at test site in Kazakhstan
    • 1958  Pop musician, songwriter Michael Jackson is born in Gary, Indiana
    • 2005  Hurricane Katrina comes ashore for the second time; worst natural disaster in U.S. history
    • 2007  Hero security guard Richard Jewel dies; discovered bomb planted by Eric Robert Rudolph in Centennial Olympic Park; saves hundreds of lives but is falsely accused of planting device

Lost and Found – August 28th Edition

What to remember about August 28th…

    • 1774  Elizabeth Ann Bayley is born in New York City; founder of 1st Catholic school in America and later canonized as St. Elizabeth
    • 1907  19-year-old James E. “Jim” Casey borrows $100 from a friend to established the American Messenger Company in Seattle, Washington; becomes United Parcel Service (UPS)
    • 1917  Suffragists protesting President Wilson’s failure to support their right to vote are arrested outside the White House
    • 1941  German SS General Franz Jaeckeln orders more than 23,000 Hungarian Jews machine-gunned in Ukraine
    • 1963  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, gives I Have A Dream speech to 250,000 in front of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.; defining moment of the American Civil Rights Movement.
    • 1966  Soviet Union announces that it is training North Vietnamese pilots to combat American planes at secret base
    • 1968  Thousands clash with police in demonstrations against the Vietnam War at Democrat National Convention
    • 2005  Hurricane Katrina strengthens to Category Five
    • 2008  Barack Hussein Obama accepts nomination of the Democratic Party to be their candidate for President of the United States

Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. – AFP/Getty Images

Presidential Trivia – Lyndon Baines Johnson

Think you know a lot about the President of the United States?  Let us dig down into the dustbin of history and see what we can find.

Our candidate today is:  Lyndon Baines Johnson, 36th President of the United States

  • Born: August 27, 1908 near Stonewall, Texas
  • Died: January 22, 1973 of a heart attack; he died on a plane flying to a San Antonio hospital from the same LBJ family ranch he was born on
  • Height: 6’0″
  • Childhood and school activities:  baseball, public speaking
  • Education:  Graduated from Southwest Texas State Teachers’ College in 1930, edited the college newspaper
  • Military Service:  United States Navy 1941-1942, final rank Lieutenant Commander, awarded the Silver Star
  • Civilian profession: Teacher, Congressional aide, politician
  • Married to Claudia Alta “Lady Bird” Taylor (December 22, 1912 – July 11, 2007) on November 17, 1934, at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in San Antonio, Texas
  • The ring that LBJ gave Mrs. Johnson on their wedding day was bought at Sears for $2.50
  • Children: daughters Lynda and Luci
  • Political Party – Democrat
  • Term of office:  November 22, 1963 – January 20, 1969
  • Became Vice-President to President John F. Kennedy in a compromise to win southern “Dixie-crats” despite the acrimony with all the Kennedy family
  • As Vice-President, Kennedy kept LBJ busy making him head of the President’s Committee on Equal Employment Opportunities and as Chairman of the National Aeronautics Space Council
  • Sworn in as President aboard Air Force One in Dallas, Texas just 2 hours after the assassination of President Kennedy

Lyndon B. Johnson taking oath of office November 1963

  • President Johnson was the only President to take Oath of Office on an airplane (Air Force One)
  • He was the only President to be administered the oath by a woman (Federal Judge Sarah T. Hughes)
  • He was the only President to take the oath with a woman serving as his witness (Jacqueline Kennedy).
  • Johnson steadily escalated U.S. military involvement in Vietnam, increasing the number of American troops from 16,000 when he first took office in 1963 to over 500,000
  • Famous quote: “Just like the Alamo, somebody damn well needed to go to their aid. Well, by God, I’m going to Vietnam’s aid.”
  • Despite passing massive civil rights legislation racial unrest, riots, and violent demonstrations were commonplace throughout his presidency
  • President and Mrs. Johnson received the first Medicare cards upon his signing of the enacting legislation
  • Despite his Christian upbringing, LBJ was famous for his profanity, streams of cursing could often be heard through the oval office door during meetings
  • Not only were President Johnson’s initials LBJ, so were the initials of his wife and both daughters
  • Famous quotes:

You do not examine legislation in the light of the benefits it will convey if properly administered, but in the light of the wrongs it would do and the harms it would cause if improperly administered.

Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or lose.

There are no favorites in my office. I treat them all with the same general inconsideration.

The fact that a man is a newspaper reporter is evidence of some flaw of character.

The men who have guided the destiny of the United States have found the strength for their tasks by going to their knees. This private unity of public men and their God is an enduring source of reassurance for the people of America.

Official Presidential portrait of Lyndon Baines Johnson

Lost and Found – August 27th Edition

What to remember about August 27th…

    • 1776  British forces defeat General Washington’s continental forces in Battle of Brooklyn Heights
    • 1859  Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania; 1st successful well and birth of the oil industry
    • 1883  The Krakatoa volcano in Indonesia explodes; most powerful eruption in recorded history
    • 1908  President Lyndon Baines Johnson is born on a farm near Stonewall, Texas; gained office after the assassination of President Kennedy
    • 1928  Kellogg–Briand Pact (World Peace Act) outlawing war was signed
    • 1962  NASA launches space probe Mariner 2 on voyage to Venus
    • 1990  American blues guitarist and singer Stephen “Stevie Ray” Vaughan dies in helicopter crash
    • 2001  Work begins in Washington D.C. preparing the site for the National WWII Memorial
    • 2007  NFL quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons Michael Vick pleads guilty in dogfighting case; after less than 2 years i prison he is allowed to return to football
    • 2011  Hurricane Irene makes landfall in North Carolina

Lost and Found – August 26th Edition

What to remember about August 26th…

  • 1794  President Washington writes to Virginia governor Henry Lee regarding planned federal response to the Whiskey Rebellion
  • 1920  Official proclamation by the Secretary of State that the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is formally adopted; guarantees women the right to vote
  • 1939  1st televised Major League baseball game is broadcast; Cincinnati Reds play Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field
  • 1957  Soviet Union announces its 1st successful test of an intercontinental ballistic missile
  • 1968  Democrat National Convention begins in Chicago;  4 days of violent anti-war demonstrations and rioting begin
  • 1974  American aviation legend Charles Lindbergh dies; 1st person to fly nonstop and solo across the Atlantic (May 20-21, 1927)
  • 2003  Space Shuttle program: Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) releases 200 page report on shuttle Columbia’s destruction and the death of its seven astronauts

Charles Lindbergh and the Spirit of St. Louis

Warbirds – B-25 Mitchell Medium Bomber

August 19th marks the anniversary of the 1940 first flight of the storied B-25 Mitchell bomber.  Named for pioneering military aviator General Billy Mitchell, nearly 10,000 of these Warbirds were built.  Variations included medium bomber, weather reconnaissance, ground attack, anti-submarine warfare, and VIP transport.

During WWII, Mitchells would see service all over the globe.  The skies over Europe, the Middle East, Italy, and the Far East would be darkened by the B-25 thousands and thousands of times.  Air Forces that would fly this aircraft would include the U.S Army, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy, British, Canadian, Australian, Dutch, Soviet, Chinese, Brazilian, and Free French.

In the war in Europe, Mitchells supported ground troops from the Battle of El Alamein to D-Day.  After the successful landings in Normandy, squadrons of B-25s would be relocated to airfields in France and Belgium to support forces as they fought towards Berlin.

But, this Warbird earned her greatest fame with the daring Doolittle Raid of Tokyo on April 18, 1942.  16 aircraft took off from the pitching and rolling deck of the USS Hornet (CV-8) over 700 miles from the Japanese mainland.  They delivered their payloads without loss and then proceeded towards China with hopes of reaching safe territory.  Running low on fuel, most of the craft ditched.  Some of the crew were killed while others were taken prisoner by the Japanese.  All were considered heroes for having taken the war to the Japanese – shattering their invincible self-image.  The story of the Doolittle raid was made into the film Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo starring Spencer Tracy, Van Johnson and Robert Mitchum.

Original footage of the 1942 Doolittle Tokyo Air Raid.

Another notable incident in the Mitchell’s history is the 1945 Empire State Building crash.  On July 28, 1945, a B-25D on a personnel run from Boston flew into the building in heavy fog.  The three crew and 11 others died in the crash.  This incident led to the decision to engineer the World Trade Center to withstand the impact of a Boeing 707.  Unfortunately, the aircraft that hit the towers on September 11, 2001 had significantly higher masses and were travelling much faster than the 1960’s simulations took into account.

Specifications, history, and details of the Doolittle Raid in this video.

Archive video footage of the Doolittle Raid.

National Airborne Day

Don’t forget to hug a paratrooper today.  It’s National Airborne Day!

I was terrified of heights as a kid and I hated that feeling.  In Boy Scouts, I forced myself to learn to repel and rock climb to get rid of the fear; but it was still there.  So, when I joined the Army, I decided that to truly get rid of the fear I needed to volunteer for airborne duty.  I reported for training at Fort Benning and  3-weeks, a couple thousand push ups, and 5 jumps later I proudly graduated with my Airborne Wings. 

Funny thing is, I was still afraid of heights.  What I learned though was that the fear never goes away.  You just need to have faith to become strong enough to conquer what will aways be there.

This link will bring you to a collection of paratrooper and soldier prayers – many said or written on the eve of battle.  I hope that they can give you comfort and strength as they have so many of America’s brave defenders.  The one below is one of my favorites.

Lost and Found – August 15th Edition

What to remember about August 15th…

  • 1780  Irregulars led by LTC Frances “Swamp Fox” Marion rout crown loyalists at Port’s Ferry, South Carolina
  • 1914  Opening of the American-built Panama Canal is inaugurated with the transit of the U.S. ship Ancon, President Carter signs canal over to Panamanian control December 31, 1977
  • 1935  Famed aviator Wiley Post and celebrated actor and journalist Will Rogers die in plane crash in Alaska
  • 1939  Classic film The Wizard of Oz premiers at Grauman’s Chinese Theater
  • 1945  Emperor Hirohito announces to his people that Japan has surrendered to the Allies
  • 1947  200 years of English rule ends and the nations of India and Pakistan become independent
  • 1969  The Woodstock Music Festival opens in upstate New York; performers includes Jimi Hendrix, the Who, the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, CCR and more
  • 1971  President Nixon imposes a 90-day freeze on wages and prices; ends the convertibility of U.S. dollars into gold
  • 1979  Francis Ford Coppola film Apocalypse Now opens in U.S.
  • 2003  Libya formally accepts responsibility for 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland; express no remorse and admit no guilt

Panama Canal

Lost and Found – August 14th Edition

What to remember about August 14th…

  • 1848  An act of Congress establishes the Oregon Territory
  • 1935  President Roosevelt signs into law the Social Security Act
  • 1945  American actor and comedian Steve Martin is born (L.A. Story and Roxanne are my favorites)
  • 1965  7th Marines land in Chu Lai to begin combat operations in South Vietnam
  • 1980  Lech Walesa leads strikes at Gdansk shipyards leading to strikes across Poland; Solidarity movement takes hold
  • 1994  International terrorist Ilich Ramírez Sánchez aka Carlos the Jackal is captured in Sudan
  • 2003  Massive blackout in northeast U.S. and parts of Canada leave an estimated 55 million without power
  • 2006  Journalists Steve Centani and Olaf Wiig kidnapped by Palestinian Hamas gunmen; they are released only after they convert to Islam under threat of death
  • 2010  President Barak Hussein Obama states his support for the building of a mosque at Ground Zero in New York