Monthly Archives: June 2012

Lost and Found – June 24th Edition

What to remember about June 24th…

  • 1314  Robert the Bruce leads Scottish forces to victory over Edward II at the Battle of Bannockburn
  • 1779  American allies France and Spain begin almost 7 month-long Great Siege of Gibraltar; largest action of the Revolutionary War
  • 1885 Future 28th President Woodrow Wilson marries Ellen Axson
  • 1901  1st exhibition of works of Pablo Picasso begins in Paris
  • 1941  President Franklin D. Roosevelt pledges all possible support for the Soviet Union
  • 1948  Soviet Union begins blockade of all rail and road traffic to West Berlin; massive airlift will supply city until siege ends May 12, 1949
  • 1953  John F. Kennedy and Jaqueline Bouvier announce their engagement
  • 1957  SCOTUS rules in Roth v. United States that obscenity is not protected by the 1st Amendment
  • 1987  American actor, comedian, and musician Jackie Gleason dies (b. 1916)
  • 1993  Yale professor David Gelernter is 2nd injured in just two days by a mail-bombing; leads to formation of Unabomber Task Force

Lost and Found – June 23rd Edition

What to remember about June 23rd…

  • 1845  Congress of Texas votes in favor of annexation by U.S.
  • 1862  Confederate General Robert E. Lee meets with his corps commanders to plan his assault on the Army of the Potomac
  • 1865  In Oklahoma Territory, General Watie surrenders last Confederate Army almost two months after the War ended
  • 1931  Wiley Post and navigator Harold Gatty begin first flight around the world in a single engine aircraft
  • 1940  Hitler tours Paris; orders destruction of WWI monuments
  • 1956  Gamal Abdel Nasser elected 1st president of Egypt; Egyptian constitution ratified and Islam becomes official state religion
  • 1961  Antarctic Treaty designates continent as non-territorial scientific preserve; bans military activity
  • 1972  Title IX of the Higher Education Act is signed by President Nixon; requires “fair and equal treatment of sexes” even in sports
  • 1989  Tim Burton’s movie “Batman” released; Michael Keaton stars
  • 1993  Lorena Bobbitt “mutilates” her husband after alleged assault
  • 2005  SCOTUS rules in Kelo v. New London that local governments can seize property for private development under the 5th Amendment

Lost and Found – June 22nd Edition

What to remember about June 22nd…

  • 1775  Continental Congress authorizes issue of its 1st currency
  • 1807  British navy fires on and boards the USS Chesapeake; the  Chesapeake-Leopard Affair leads to U.S. declaration of war in 1812
  • 1911  Coronation of King George V held at Westminster Abbey
  • 1941  Germany invades Russia beginning Operation Barbarossa; more than 3 million men, 3000 tanks, and 2500 aircraft
  • 1944  President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944; G.I. Bill becomes law
  • 1945  Battle for Okinawa ends, all effective resistance is over
  • 1969  Actress/singer/movie-star Judy Garland dies at age 47
  • 1970  President Richard Nixon signs bill to lower voting age to 18; Congress later passes measure to make this the 26th Amendment
  • 1990  Checkpoint Charlie is dismantled in Berlin
  • 2008  Comedian/actor George Carlin dies

Lost and Found – June 21st Edition

What to remember about June 21st…

  • 1788  U.S. Constitution ratified by New Hampshire meaning that enough states had done so for it to go into effect (see article VII); New Hampshire admitted to the Union as 9th State
  • 1810  Future 12th President of the United States Zachary Taylor marries Margaret Smith in Kentucky
  • 1913  Georgia “Tiny” Broadwick becomes 1st woman to parachute from an airplane; later became 1st ever free-fall parachutist
  • 1939  Lou Gehrig retires from New York Yankees because of illness
  • 1940  Future 37th President of the United States Richard Nixon marries Pat Ryan in Riverside, California
  • 1942  Allied forces surrender at Tobruk, Libya
  • 1942  Japanese submarine I-25 shells Ft. Stevens in Oregon
  • 1965  Ku Klux Klan lynch mob kills 3 civil rights workers registering black voters in Meridian, Mississippi; Michael Schwerner, James Chaney, and Andrew Goodman
  • 1982 John Hinckley, Jr. found not guilty by reason of insanity in trial for the attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan
  • 1989  SCOTUS rules that burning the American flag is protected by the First amendment to the U.S. Constitution
  • 2004  SpaceShipOne makes 1st privately funded human spaceflight and wins the Ansari X Prize; Pilot Mike Melvill becomes 1st non-government astronaut in history
  • 2005 Edgar Ray Killen convicted of the 1965 murders of  Schwermer, Goodman, and Chaney

Lost and Found – June 20th Edition

What to remember about June 20th…

  • 1782  After six years of debate Congress approves Great Seal
  • 1837  Queen Victoria ascends to British throne at age 18
  • 1863  West Virginia admitted to the Union as 35th state
  • 1892  Lizzie Borden acquitted of multiple murders
  • 1898  U.S. Navy seizes Guam during Spanish-American War
  • 1967  Muhammad Ali convicted for refusing the draft
  • 1980  Movie “The Blues Brothers” opens in the U.S.
  • 1994  O.J. Simpson pleads not guilty to murder of ex-wife and friend
  • 2001  Andrea Yates drowns her 5 children in a bathtub in Houston, Texas; found not guilty by reason of insanity July 26, 2006

Original Design of the Great Seal of the United States

Lost and Found – June 19th Edition

What to remember about June 19th…

  • 1846  New York Base Ball Club defeats Knickerbockers 23-1 in 1st recorded official game of baseball; played on Elysian Field in Hoboken
  • 1864  CSS Alabama, the most successful Confederate commerce raider of the war, sunk off the coast of France by USS Kearsarge
  • 1886  Future 27th President William Howard Taft marries Hellen “Nellie” Herron in Cincinnati, Ohio
  • 1910  Father’s Day is celebrated for the 1st time
  • 1917  King George V changes royal family name to Windsor from the Germanic Saxe-Coburg-Gotha; all German titles eliminated as well
  • 1933  Exiled Communist leader Leon Trotsky given asylum in France
  • 1944  Battle of Philippine Sea begins; largest aircraft carrier battle in history; Japanese fleet irreparably damaged
  • 1953  Julius and Ethel Rosenberg executed in the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison for conspiracy to commit espionage
  • 1977  Guardian Angels leader Curtis Sliwa shot twice in Manhattan
  • 1978  Garfield comic strip first published in U.S.

Obamanomics in One Illustration

If you’ve ever needed to define kleptocracy in one brief illustration, this is it.

Obamanomics 101.

Warbirds – F-117A Night Hawk

Today’s Warbirds article is on a decidedly ugly aircraft – the Lockheed Martin F-117A Night Hawk.  Pilots and aviation enthusiasts know the aircraft as “Nighthawk”, “woblin’ goblin”, or just plain “goblin”.  Arab troops nicknamed the aircraft “Shabah” (ghost) during the Gulf War.

Developed at the infamous Skunk Works, the F-117 ushered in a new era in “stealth” aviation with her first flight on June 18, 1981.  The goal was to create a single-seat, ground-attack aircraft with the ability to evade radar through use of innovative shapes and materials versus active jamming.  Rapid delivery beginning in 1982 led to operational capability by October 1983.  The Air Force denied the existence of the aircraft until a grainy photo surfaced in 1988.  The public debut finally occurred in 1990 when 2 were flown to Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada and placed on display for a crowd of tens of thousands.

The combat history of the F-117A begins in December 1989 with strikes by two Nighthawks against targets in Panama during Operation Just Cause.  The true test of its capabilities really began during Desert Storm.  Comprising only 2% of the aircraft deployed for operations against Iraqi forces, the F-117A accounted for more than a third of all bombing runs on the first day.  And though they were the only aircraft allowed to strike inside the limits of Baghdad, none of the 36 deployed for the conflict were touched by hostile fire.  After the end of the Gulf War, the Nighthawk continued to operate in the region to enforce compliance with U.N. programs designed to deny weapons of mass destruction to Saddam Hussein’s regime.

Only one F-117A has been lost to enemy action.  On March 27, 1999 during Operation Allied Force, an Army of Yugoslavia SA-3 detonated near an F-117A piloted by Lt. Col. Dale Zelko.  The aircraft had been targeted using ground observation beginning from take-off in Italy and long-wave radar that detected the plane when the bomb bay doors were open.  The pilot ejected safely and was quickly recovered by Marine Corps combat search and rescue.  the wreckage was not bombed because of the proximity of civilians.  This allowed  Russian personnel to inspect and examine the remains.  Technology from this wreck has proved useful to both China and Russia in the development of their own stealth aircraft.

Though they were supposed to remain operational through 2011, early deployment of the F-22 Raptor led to early retirement of the F-117A in 2008.  Because of the sensitivity of the technology, Nighthawks were deemed inappropriate for export sales.  However, the fleet of F-117A’s has not been scrapped.  Instead, they remain in climate controlled hangars at the Tenopah Test Range in “mothballed” condition – possibly awaiting later reactivation or sale.  F-117A’s have been sighted in flight as recently as 2010.

If you want to see more great photos of the Nighthawk, check out the archives at AviationSpectator.com .  Details on specifications and capabilities can be found on the Federation of American Scientists website.

Lost and Found – June 18th Edition

What to remember about June 18th…

  • 1778  British troops abandon their almost nine month occupation of Philadelphia after French entry into war made city indefensible
  • 1798  President John Adams signs Naturalization act – part of the Alien and Sedition Acts; so controversial that Adams never enforces
  • 1812  President James Madison signs Declaration of War passed by Congress, War of 1812 with Britain begins
  • 1815  Wellington defeats Napoleon at Waterloo; forces his final abdication
  • 1873  Susan B. Anthony fined $100 for voting in 1872 Presidential election; she vows to and never does pay the fine
  • 1940  Hitler and Mussolini meet in Munich to discuss plans and the late entry of Italy into the war; Mussolini leaves berated and dissatisfied
  • 1953  8 day struggle to hold Outpost Harry ends; 4 American and 1 Greek infantry companies hold off over 13,000 Chinese troops
  • 1965  Strategic Air Command (SAC) B-52 bombers are used in Vietnam for 1st time; Operation Arc Light is under way
  • 1981  1st flight of Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk stealth fighter
  • 1983  1st female American Astronaut – Dr. Sally K. Ride – is launched into space aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-7)
  • 2009  NASA launches Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to create 3D map of the lunar surface, identify potential resources and landing sites

Send Barack A Father’s Day Card … And Some Cash

Breitbart.com tipped me to something I just had to share.  Today’s Father’s Day message from First Lady Michelle Obama asks “Will you wish Barack a happy Father’s Day?”

Even if you aren’t insulted by the notion that the President is somehow your father and deserving of your appreciation on this holiday, you should be galled by the blatant cynicism of the site.  If you actually decide to give the Obama campaign the info to send the card and get put on their e-mail list, you will then be sent to a contribution form asking for a donation.  Apparently your holiday wishes aren’t sufficient.